Watching A Fin Whale Is Rare But This Necropsy Is Unimaginable. This Literally Blew My Mind!

You can see the images of a washed up fin male shark on Herring cove beach in Prince town last week. A specialized team of marine biologists was called for performing the necropsy. One of their members’ board of trustees Michael Moore was the in charge and invited the writer to be a spectator. Although the whales was found to be smelly, he appreciated the way all were doing their jobs successfully and in full co-operation.

The Fin whale lying on the beach. Photo shot by Rachael Montejo.

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Instructors briefing the necropsy volunteer team of Woods Hole, IFAW. Photo by Rachael Montejo.

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Started with the tongue the first cut as it bulges in the background.

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The volunteers now proceed towards the blubber. Photo by Rachael Montejo.

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It seems that the shark became the victim of a ship strike. Photo by Madelyn Shaw.

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The skin of the shark appears as a rubber spread sheet. Volunteers trying to peel it off.

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Earbone in situ. Photo by Madelyn Shaw.

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Jaw removing is definitely a difficult task.

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Now comes the intestine. Photo by Madelyn Shaw.

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Oh what a heart! Photo by Madelyn Shaw.

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The throat pleats can be expanded or the grooves of the rorqual. Photo by Madelyn Shaw.

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Cross sectional view of the throat pleats. Photo by Madelyn Shaw.

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The tongue and the horny material of upper jaws. Photo by Madelyn Shaw.

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Only the ribs remaining to be cut. The day then ends. Photo by Madelyn Shaw.

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